Comprehensive list of Most Useful Stack Overflow answers for Linux Users

Source: http://stackoverflow.com/

Disclaimer:  The post is intended to only serve as a collection of all relevant stack overflow questions which are relevant and are most common to users.

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/9081/grep-a-file-but-show-several-surrounding-lines

Grep a file, but show several surrounding lines?

For BSD or GNU grep you can use -B num to set how many lines before the match and -A num for the number of lines after the match.
grep -B 3 -A 2 foo README.txt
If you want the same number of lines before and after you can use -C num.
grep -C 3 foo README.txt
This will show 3 lines before and 3 lines after.

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Git

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/927358/how-to-undo-last-commits-in-git

How to undo last commit(s) in Git?

Undo a commit and redo

$ git commit -m "Something terribly misguided"              (1)
$ git reset HEAD~                                           (2)
<< edit files as necessary >>                               (3)
$ git add ...                                               (4)
$ git commit -c ORIG_HEAD                                   (5)

This is what you want to undo
This leaves your working tree (the state of your files on disk) unchanged but undoes the commit and leaves the changes you committed unstaged (so they'll appear as "Changes not staged for commit" in git status and you'll need to add them again before committing). If you only want to add more changes to the previous commit, or change the commit message1, you could use git reset --soft HEAD~ instead, which is like git reset HEAD~ but leaves your existing changes staged.
Make corrections to working tree files.
git add anything that you want to include in your new commit.
Commit the changes, reusing the old commit message. reset copied the old head to .git/ORIG_HEAD; commit with -c ORIG_HEAD will open an editor, which initially contains the log message from the old commit and allows you to edit it. If you do not need to edit the message, you could use the -C option.

1 Note, however, that you don't need to reset to an earlier commit if you just made a mistake in your commit message. The easier option is to git reset (to unstage any changes you've made since) and then git commit --amend, which will open your default commit message editor pre-populated with the last commit message.

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http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2003505/how-to-delete-a-git-branch-both-locally-and-remotely

How to delete a Git branch both locally and remotely?

I want to delete a branch both locally and on my remote project fork on GitHub.

Failed Attempts to Delete Remote Branch

$ git branch -d remotes/origin/bugfix
error: branch 'remotes/origin/bugfix' not found.

$ git branch -d origin/bugfix
error: branch 'origin/bugfix' not found.

$ git branch -rd origin/bugfix
Deleted remote branch origin/bugfix (was 2a14ef7).

$ git push
Everything up-to-date

$ git pull
From github.com:gituser/gitproject
* [new branch] bugfix -> origin/bugfix
Already up-to-date.

What do I need to do differently to successfully delete the remotes/origin/bugfix branch both locally and on GitHub?

Answer : -

Executive Summary

$ git push origin --delete <branch_name>
$ git branch -d <branch_name>
Delete Local Branch

To delete the local branch use:

$ git branch -d branch_name
Note: The -d option is an alias for --delete, which only deletes the branch if it has already been fully merged in its upstream branch. You could also use -D, which is an alias for --delete --force, which deletes the branch "irrespective of its merged status." [Source: man git-branch]

Delete Remote Branch [Updated on 1-Feb-2012]

As of Git v1.7.0, you can delete a remote branch using

$ git push origin --delete <branch_name>
which might be easier to remember than

$ git push origin :<branch_name>
which was added in Git v1.5.0 "to delete a remote branch or a tag."

Therefore, the version of Git you have installed will dictate whether you need to use the easier or harder syntax.

Delete Remote Branch [Original Answer from 5-Jan-2010]

From Chapter 3 of Pro Git by Scott Chacon:

Deleting Remote Branches

Suppose you’re done with a remote branch — say, you and your collaborators are finished with a feature and have merged it into your remote’s master branch (or whatever branch your stable codeline is in). You can delete a remote branch using the rather obtuse syntax git push [remotename] :[branch]. If you want to delete your serverfix branch from the server, you run the following:

$ git push origin :serverfix
To git@github.com:schacon/simplegit.git
 - [deleted]         serverfix
Boom. No more branch on your server. You may want to dog-ear this page, because you’ll need that command, and you’ll likely forget the syntax. A way to remember this command is by recalling the git push [remotename] [localbranch]:[remotebranch] syntax that we went over a bit earlier. If you leave off the [localbranch] portion, then you’re basically saying, “Take nothing on my side and make it be [remotebranch].”
I issued git push origin :bugfix and it worked beautifully. Scott Chacon was right—I will want to dog ear that page (or virtually dog ear by answering this on Stack Overflow).

Then you should execute this on other machines

git fetch --all --prune to propagate changes.



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How to check version of python modules?

>>> import statlib
>>> print statlib.__version__

>>> import construct
>>> print contruct.__version__

Source: - http://stackoverflow.com/questions/20180543/how-to-check-version-of-python-modules

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Add user to existing Group?
sudo usermod -a -G groupName userName
Adding a user to a group:
sudo adduser user group
Removing a user from a group:
sudo deluser user group

Source: - http://askubuntu.com/questions/79565/add-user-to-existing-group

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